Power Supply for TS100 Soldering Iron – Activating God Mode!

I recently found an awesome power supply for the TS100 I’ve to share with you guys! When I first got the TS100, I was powering it with a 4S LiPo. The performance was okay, I wasn’t blown away by it. That’s because at 16V, you are only using 45% of the power. To get the most out of it you should really use 24V.

What Differences Do 16V and 24V Make?

Input voltage significantly affects the power of TS100 soldering iron (review).

Input Voltage Power Time to heat up from 25°C to 400°C
16V (4S) 30W 30 Seconds
24V (6S) 65W 11 Seconds

Powering the TS100 at 24V is like turning on “God Mode”!

It heats up three times faster compared to 16V. It only takes 11 seconds to reach 400°C from room temperature, even a lot of desktop irons struggle to do this. Soldering PDB and XT60 also becomes effortless as it puts out so much heat.

Even if you don’t use high temperature, you are still going to benefit from powering at higher voltage. The temperature is going to hold more consistently during soldering.

Where to Buy

I could find the same Voltage Regulator from many vendors, but I bought mine from Banggood. It’s called “DC-DC 10-32V To 12-35V 150W Boost Regulator”.

Spec

Being a Step-Up, or boost voltage regulator, it takes a lower input voltage and outputs a higher voltage. E.g. it can convert 12V of a 3S Lipo, or 16V of a 4S, to 24V, so you can use your 3S or 4S battery just like a 6S!

The output voltage is adjustable through the potentiometer.

  • Input Voltage: 10V – 32V
  • Output Voltage: 12V – 35V
  • Power: 150W
  • Current Limit: Up to 16A, but anything above 10A should upgrade the heatsink (The TS100 only uses around 1.5A to 2A)

If you are looking for a step down voltage regulator, this is what I use.

User Experience and Mods

Apart from the ugly inductor winding, it’s been a solid piece of kit. The heat-sinks are properly installed on the FET’s, and they don’t even get warm after 15 mins of usage, powering the TS100 at 450°C. (You can up the maximum temperature from 400°C to 450°C after flashing custom firmware).

It doesn’t have the best build quality, but bear in mind I bought this for less than $3, can’t really complain! I would probably spend this amount on just the heatsinks in the UK LOL :D

I am not a big fan of the screw terminals, so I soldered two XT60 connectors to the input and output for easy connection.

For safety, I also cut a couple of pieces of plastic sheet and use some nylon standoffs, screws, as the case.

And here is the whole setup! It’s powered by just a 4S LiPo. I don’t really use this tiny battery, it’s just for the photo. I use a 4S 5000mAh for the TS100, and it usually lasts 3 to 5 builds :)

Don’t forget you need something to monitor the voltage of your battery, I just plug in a buzzer to the balance lead.

Other Methods to Supply 24V

Alternatively, you can also just grab a 6S LiPo and power your TS100 with it. For example, one of these big ones which you can also use for field charging:

However, you probably want to use a half-charged pack, because the TS100 is only rated for up to 24V. A fully charged 6S battery is 25.2V, so it may or may not damage your iron. I tried powering it with fully charged 6S battery a few times in the past and it didn’t get damaged. This is not an encouragement, it’s still safer to follow the spec. :)

One thought on “Power Supply for TS100 Soldering Iron – Activating God Mode!

  1. Chad Bjorklund

    I know your setup is targeted for mobile soldering but when I just wanted to throw out there that for “at home” soldering, a laptop power supply is perfect for the TS100. I was going to purchase a dedicated PSU for the TS100 but since I had so many of the Dell ones sitting around, I thought I’d give it a try (luckily, most are the high wattage ones too).
    For Dell, just search for:
    DC 5.5 x 2.5mm Male To 7.4 x5.0mm Female Charger Adapter.

    Any other vendor, just look up the barrel plug dimensions (and replace the 7.4×5.0mm above)

    I haven’t formally timed it but I’m pretty sure it heats up in <10 seconds to 400 degC.

    Reply

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