Review: iFlight CineBee 75HD Whoop

The Cinebee is 3S powered Cinematic tiny whoop from iFlight, equipped with a Caddx Turtle V2 FPV/HD camera.

This review is written by PropsFPV. This is his first attempt on product reviews, please take it easy on him :)

Where to Buy

These are the recommended LiPo batteries:

It doesn’t matter what batteries you use as long as the shape fits the quad. I will try both of these batteries and see if I notice any difference.

What’s in the box

In the box you can find the following:

  • 2x set of stickers (One is already in the quad)
  • 2x spares motors
  • 2x set of 3 blades propellers (Genfam)
  • 1x set of 4 blades propellers (HQ)
  • 3x battery straps
  • 4x set screws
  • 2x spares motor guards

I am pleasantly shocked by the two spare motors it comes with. Never seen this in any BNF kits.

They include in the box two different set of props: triblades Gemfan for general use and the four blades HQ props for more smooth flights.

Specs and Features

Here is the specs of the quad:

  • SucceX F4 Micro 16×16 Tower (Supports 2S – 4S LiPo)
  • SucceX Mirco 12A 4in1 ESC
  • iFlight 1103 motors (1.5mm shaft)
  • 25/100/200mW VTX (SmartAudio, UFL connector)
  • Caddx Turtle v2 HD/FPV cam
  • Gemfan 1635 40mm 3/4 blade OR HQ 1.6×1.6×4
  • iFlight Prop Guards 40mm

The weight of the Cinebee 75HD is 66g, a little bit lighter than the Beta85X HD (75g) but heavier than Beta75 (only 45,3g).

This quad probably has the widest range of receiver options:

  • Frsky mini XM+ (+ $16.00 )
  • FrSky R-XSR (+ $22.00 )
  • FS-A8S V2 (+ $16.00 )
  • FT4X mini FASST S.BUS Receiver (+ $16.00 )
  • RM601X DSM2/DSMX (+ $10.00 )
  • TBS Crossfire Nano RX (+ $30.00 )
  • Frsky R9 mini (+ $20.00 )

My test unit came with a Frsky XM+ FCC receiver. If you are also getting the XM+, make sure to pick the right firmware (FCC or LBT). But don’t worry if you picked the wrong one, you can still flash the receiver to the firmware you want.

Closer look at the iFlight Cinebee 75HD Whoop

In this frame we can find three different materials, from carbon fibre on his top and bottom plate, you and rigid plastic to make it durable to crashes and also jello free!

The stack is soft mounted to avoid any vibrations, they try to make it as vibrations free as possible to be able to have a smoothest videos as they could.

The camera angles goes from 0 till 55 degrees if needed.

The VTX is a SucceX Mirco, it comes mounted on top of the FC, with a UFL antenna connector, you can change all the settings through Smart Audio so you don’t have to use the push button to change settings.

It has PIT mode and also you can choose between 25mw 100mw and 200mW.

The receiver is mounted in a 3D printed holder that also holds the RX antennas and VTX antenna. However I’d recommend to secure the antenna tubes with a little bit of glue as they can come off really easily.

 

It comes with a Caddx Turtle v2 HD, the PCB comes integrated at the bottom of the quadcopter covered with a plastic that also help keeping the SD card in place in case of a crash (really handy and fit perfectly, you won’t have any problem with it at all).

It comes with an extension to connect the camera control so you can change the settings of it, sadly on the version I’m review it came without it.

The motors are brushless iFlight 1103 10000kv.

I don’t really like the Turtle’s FPV feed, it looks kind of washed out. It would be great if they included in the box the controller for the camera so I could adjust the camera settings.

Out of the box, there is a little bit of jello in the HD footage when flying outdoor.

I flew it indoors and it flies amazing, I can’t complain at all. Outside basically the same, I flew on a windy day and I thought it was gonna struggle, but it didn’t at all.

Flying with a long LiPo makes it harder due to the weight distribution. So I would recommend a battery with the shape like the Tattu here.

I’m using the latest version of Betaflight available at the moment (4.0.4) with stock PID (as they recommend) but I think it needs a little bit of tuning to make it perfect.

One feature I can’t get to work is Turtle mode, I tried several times in different conditions and I can’t manage to flip the quad over, maybe it’s a bit too heavy.

Conclusion

Overall, fantastic performance and build quality. The price is good, and the Cinebee comes with many spare parts.

Straight out of the box it flies amazing and had zero problem. It actually flew better with the old version of Betaflight, than BF4.0. If you don’t know how to tune it, do not update it.

If you are looking to make amazing videos, you should probably spend more to get something more professional to carry a Gopro 7. But if you just want to do casual and slow HD videos, this is a great choice to consider.

Here is some footage flying outdoors

Where to Buy

Guest Writer: PropsFPV

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