The Best Way to Power FPV Goggles: Optimal Solutions for DJI, HDZero, Skyzone, and Walksnail Models

by Oscar

FPV drone flying offers an immersive experience like no other, and the key to this thrilling perspective lies in the FPV goggles. With various models like DJI Goggles V1/V2 and Goggles 2, HDZero, Skyzone SKY04X, and Walksnail Goggles X on the market, understanding how to power them effectively is crucial for longer battery life. Let’s dive into the different powering methods for these goggles and explore the best options based on their voltage input requirements.

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New to FPV Drone? Learn how to choose FPV Goggles in our buyer’s guide: https://oscarliang.com/fpv-goggles/

Finding Out Input Voltage Requirements

Different FPV Goggles might require varying battery voltages. Here are some of the most popular FPV Goggles and their input voltage ranges:

  • DJI Goggles 2: Not specified (2S)
  • HDZero Goggles: 7V – 25.2V
  • Walksnail Goggles X: 7V – 26V
  • Skyzone SKY04X: 6.5V – 25.2V
  • Fatshark HDO2: 7V – 13V

How to Estimate Battery Life

To estimate battery life, you need to know two things:

  1. The capacity of the battery.
  2. The current draw of the FPV Goggles.

Battery life can be estimated by dividing the capacity of the battery by the current draw of your FPV Goggles. For example, the Walksnail Goggles X draws about 0.35A at 25V. This means a 6S 1000mAh LiPo would last roughly two and a half hours.

Dedicated 2S LiPo Battery

Many FPV Goggles, including older models from Fatshark, Eachine, Skyzone, and Aomway, support 2S input. Therefore, this Tattu 2S 2500mAh might be the safest option. This battery is specifically designed for FPV goggles and comes with a 5.5mm barrel connector (DC3.5). It features an LED battery indicator that shows the battery level. For more information, see my review: https://oscarliang.com/tattu-2s-2500mah-lipo-battery/

Get it here:

Li-Ion Packs

Personally, I prefer using Li-ion battery packs for powering FPV goggles because they have a higher energy density than LiPos. This means that for the same weight, Li-ion batteries last longer than LiPos. This is especially beneficial as FPV goggles don’t draw a lot of current, so the low discharge rate of Li-ion batteries is perfectly adequate.

The Auline 4S 2600mAh is a good option. Most modern goggles support a 4S input, and four 18650 cells aren’t too heavy to carry in your pocket while flying, yet they still offer excellent battery life.

Get the Auline 4S 2600mAh 18650 packs here:

Alternatively you can build your own from scratching using 18650 cells. From my 18650 batteries test, I’ve found these to be great cells.

Panasonic NCR18650B 3400mAh:

Molicel P26A/P28A 18650:

Sony VTC6 18650:

I have a step-by-step tutorial here demonstrating how to build such a battery pack: https://oscarliang.com/li-ion-battery-long-range/

Goggles BEC

Speedybee Goggles Bec Led 3 Digit Display

This is essentially a step-down voltage regulator specifically made for powering FPV Goggles, particularly the DJI Goggles 2. I’ve been using this for almost a year and it’s proven reliable. See my review for the pros and cons: https://oscarliang.com/speedybee-goggles-bec/

Get it from:

Any 4S-6S Drone Batteries

Since most goggles support 4S and even 6S, you might be able to use any 4S/6S drone batteries to power your goggles. However, ensure your goggles are compatible with the battery voltage before connecting.

Best Practices and Safety Tips

Regardless of the goggle model, it’s essential to consider the following best practices:

  • Always use a battery with a voltage regulator when the maximum input voltage of the goggles is near the battery’s output voltage.
  • Check the battery’s connector type and ensure it matches your goggles. Adapters are available but may add extra bulk.
  • Consider the weight and size of the battery for comfort, especially during long flying sessions.
  • Regularly inspect your batteries for any signs of damage or swelling. Safety is paramount in FPV flying.
  • For extended sessions, having spare batteries or a portable charging solution can be incredibly useful.

Conclusion

Choosing the right power source for your FPV goggles is crucial for an uninterrupted and enjoyable flying experience. Whether you’re using DJI, HDZero, Skyzone, or Walksnail goggles, selecting a battery that matches the voltage requirements and balances duration with comfort will enhance your FPV adventures. Always prioritize safety and check compatibility to ensure a smooth and immersive flight every time. Happy flying!

Edit History

  • Feb 2018 – Post created
  • Dec 2023 – Post re-written

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26 comments

Maverick 29th December 2023 - 12:45 pm

Hello Oscar, I have a question. DJI Goggles v1 can be powered from a 2S up to 4S, DJI Goggles v2 from a 3S to a 6S. But why if the Goggles v2 battery by DJI is a 2S? I’ve tried flying a tinywhoop with a 2S Li-Ion and it works…

Reply
Mark 12th June 2023 - 11:36 pm

You should update this for 2023! Like…what is the best option for powering external digital recievers?

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Oscar 13th June 2023 - 2:05 am

I should, a lot have changed, but there’s just so many posts that have higher priority for updates :) but eventually i will get to this.

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Remi Leonhardsen 19th January 2022 - 7:22 am

How about just running THREE 18650 in series? This would let us run the cells to a much lower voltage so we can get the true capasity, and the third cell would add even more capasity. If the warning voltage is too low we could add a diode or two in series to raise the battery voltage when reaching the warning voltage. 3×18650 holders can be found on ebay and thiniverse and we could even go for 21700 of 26650 cells.

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Mart 22nd October 2021 - 10:19 pm

could you use the Tattu 2S 2500mAh as an external battery for the flysight black pearl monitor?

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Chris S 26th September 2020 - 11:07 pm

Gaoneng (GNB) makes a 3000mah 2s lipo for googles, too. It has a voltage indicator built-in, and it includes an XT60 connector to make it charger-friendly.

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Troy 20th December 2019 - 8:44 pm

Oscar, Looking at the Tattu 2S 2500mAh looks like the way to go. So far, nobody comes right out to say what type of 18650 is needed for the battery case, plus I really don’t need to get into another battery ecosystem. Looking at one of the links for this Tattu states a 3.5mm plug !!??. OK, how do I charge this battery? What is the required barrel connector? Both O.D. and I.D. 5.5mm plugs can have 2.5mm or 2.1mm center pin which nobody will specify.
Thanks

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Oscar 21st December 2019 - 5:10 am

If you click the link to my review of the Tattu 2S 2500mah, you will find info on how I charge it (using a cheap adapter): https://oscarliang.com/tattu-2s-2500mah-lipo-battery/

The battery I linked has the right sized barrel connector for the FPV goggles. I wouldn’t worry about it maybe a mistaken description.

Reply
Bzou 25th September 2019 - 7:00 am

I’ve just tried it and it worked!
I can now have infinite power while training in the simulator without having to wait for a charge!
Pretty awesome!

Reply
Bzou 25th September 2019 - 6:34 am

hey Oscar, great article! I was wondering if I could powerup my Skyzone using a Power Adapter I use to power a touchscreen display. It outputs DC 12v 3000mA.
Then I could plug it straight into the wall and don’t worry about charging batteries when training in the simulator.

Do you know anyone who’s tried that? I’m not sure if there is anything else I need to be mindful of.
Thanks

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Oscar 26th September 2019 - 3:27 pm

Yea should work.

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Phantom 1 29th August 2019 - 6:57 pm

Why can you only charge at .5 and lower? Most 18650 can be charged at 1 amp on modern chargers.

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Oscar 30th August 2019 - 12:09 am

Bad for battery life. On the other hand LiPo is fine with charging at 1C.

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Dan LYTTLETON 5th February 2019 - 11:34 pm

Hi Oscar, I read someone recommend getting a
regular 10000mah Lion USB charging pack and using a USB to 12v/9v barrel adapter like this one: amazon.com/gp/aw/d/B01ID90K4A

I was planning to do this with my aomway commanders when they arrive, as it seems easier to be able to just charge up the USB pack and plug it in and have it in my back pocket. Do you know if this will work OK and is it an option you’d recommend at all? Thanks!!!

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Oscar 10th February 2019 - 9:24 pm

Kind of Unnecessary IMO.
In terms of Watt-hour, that’s 10*3.7=37wh. Taking into account power loss due to voltage step-up conversion, assume you get 90% of that which is 33.3WH.
A 2-cell 3400mAh 18650 gives you 25.16Wh.
So that’s like only around 30% increase in battery life…

Reply
duncan 13th December 2018 - 5:35 am

I was wondering why i get the voltage beeps on 50% thanks Oscar!!

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fate 11th April 2018 - 6:01 pm

Hi Oscar, does this Tattu 2500 have normal balance lead so I could charge it on my normal charger with a DC to XT60 adapter?

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Oscar 17th April 2018 - 8:43 pm

yes it has balance lead.

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pizzy 2nd April 2018 - 5:23 pm

Hey Oscar I am the 4s lipo power everything guy, so yeah I made an awesome goggle power cable, it has a nice step down, volt meter, and a toggle button. You should do a tutorial on it. Also I have a cheap $18 cordless drill I use for props it’s 18v so I just soldered and xt60 female on it takes 4s fine, my clear view take 4s. So everything for my power can take 4s so no more carrying 2s or 3s packs around, or changing settings on chargers do it man!

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rcschim 26th February 2018 - 12:49 pm

I found a mod to add the balance lead cable so I could also charge the 18650 cells inside this fatshark cell cage. Easy mod.

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Egon 16th February 2018 - 11:12 am

Have a read through the specs of your goggles as some will run on a higher voltage battery. Fatshark goggles are rated at higher voltages and I have run 3S batteries on fatshark goggles for many years.

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Glen 15th February 2018 - 11:00 pm

It adds wires, but I swear by powering them from your TX battery – that way you only have one not-quad-lipo thing to charge when you get home, and you can use a much larger capacity without weight issues. If you want to get tricky with disassembly, you can mount a ClearView inside a Taranis and have a single power+video cable to your headset.

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deadmoo 15th February 2018 - 6:51 pm

What about the battery pack that was designed for the Eachine EV100 goggles? Can it be used on other googles? If so, how does is compare to these other options?

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Bruce 16th February 2018 - 1:44 am

I use the ev100 pack with my Aomways, it works great.

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Oscar 6th March 2018 - 4:56 pm

As long as the voltage of the battery meets the requirement of your goggles you would be fine.

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Gene 2nd May 2019 - 10:25 pm

I use the EV100 battery on my Skyzone Sky03’s. Works good so far. However, it does not come with the “balance” connector, so won’t work for the fan connector on a Fatshark.

Reply