Review: iSDT Q6 Nano LiPo Charger

The iSDT Q6 Nano is the cheapest and smallest LiPo charger iSDT ever made. I’ve been using their chargers exclusively for over 4 years now without a single problem so I am excited about this one. I will go through the features and compare it to other small LiPo chargers.

Where to Buy?

There are 3 color you can choose from: white, green and yellow.

Specs

  • Input Voltage: DC 10-30V
  • Ouput Voltage: DC 1-30V
  • Max Charge Current: 8A
  • Max Charging Power: 200W
  • Max Discharge Current: 1A
  • Max Discharge Power: 10W
  • LiPo Balance Port for 2S – 6S
  • Supported Battery Types:
    • LiFe,Lion,LiPo,LiHV: 1-6S
    • Pb: 1-12S
    • NiMH: 1-16S
  • Display: 1.5″ 240X240 IPS LCD
  • Size: 72x72x32mm
  • Weight: 116g

Closer Look at iSDT Q6 Nano LiPo Charger

The Q6 Nano is actually not that much smaller than the iSDT Q6 Pro I’ve been using, and it’s definitely not as small as the ToolkitRC M6. But in some ways the Q6 Nano is better than the M6 which I will talk about later.

The power input is an XT60 connector, it takes 10V to 30V DC voltage. That means you will need a power supply to run this charger. I will give you a couple of recommendations at the end.

Alternatively you can just power it from another LiPo battery, this is great for field charging.

Next to it is the Micro USB port which is for connecting to your computer to update the firmware. They even have their own software for this, so it’s very easy to do.

On the other side, we have the output ports – an XT60 and a balance port that supports 2S to 6S.

The iSDT Q6 Nano charger can charge 1S to 6S LiPo, with a maximum output power of 200W and up to 8A of charging current. It’s not as powerful as some of the more expensive chargers, but to be honest, that’s plenty for most people. After all, it’s a tiny little charger you can easily carry around. But if you do need more power, check out the Q6 Pro, it’s 300W.

And you can do “parallel charge” with the Q6 Nano too.

The cooling fan comes out of the side and not underneath like many previous iSDT chargers. It’s so much better to use outdoor as the fan won’t be covered up by grass again and overheat.

It supports BATTGO technology, but it’s not really a useful feature as there is not that many companies that make BATTGo compatible batteries.

I think they’ve fixed the issue with the fan where it would turn on at high speed upon power up, now it only turns on when it gets too warm and it works much more silently.

The screen is a lot smaller than the standard Q6, you might have to get closer to see the text. And it doesn’t come with screen protector, can’t complain at this price point. You will certainly have a messed up screen after sometime, just like all of my iSDT chargers. Perhaps you should keep the original screen protector on and don’t peel it off :)

The “3-way” push button is not easy to use. Pressing the top and bottom of the button is fine (to scroll up and down), but hitting the middle button for Enter is very tricky as you could accidentally hit the up or down button. It will take some getting used to. Anyway, it’s one sturdy design that should last.

Features

Plug in the battery, and the charger automatically detects the number of cells which saves you time entering that in the menu. 

There are 5 tasks you can do: Charge, Discharge, Storage, DC Power and Destroy, all these are very self-explanatory. The Storage option will put the LiPo at 3.85V per cell, which is the safest state. The Destroy option will discharge the LiPo down to 0V for disposal, however it will take a very long time, so I normally just use my light bulb discharger for that.

Check out this guide to learn how to dispose Lipo properly.

You can also charge other types of batteries with the Q6 nano, including LI-Ion, LiFe, LiHV and NiMH.

I am very surprised to see the new feature – DC Power. It basically turns the Q6 nano into a adjustable power supply that’s capable of outputting 2V to 30V, up to 5A! It’s a great little tool for bench-testing  and powering electrical equipment. I’ve only seen this function on much more expensive chargers, it’s such a nice addition.

During charging, you can see current and voltage of each cell. However, when charging your LiPo always make sure your battery can take the current set in the charger, otherwise the battery could overheat or even catch fire. Check out this guide to learn how to handle your LiPo properly.

Scroll down, it will show you the input and output voltage and power, as well as charger temperature.

It even shows you the internal resistance of each cell. Internal resistance is a great tool to determine the health of your battery pack. This guide explains how to read internal resistance.

The System Settings menu is identical to other iSDT chargers, where you can set language, back-light, beep volume, Input voltage and power etc…

Voltage Calibration

I had to calibrate my Q6 Nano as the voltage reading wasn’t accurate enough. It was only off by a little so it shouldn’t be a huge problem, but you should check yours and calibrate it just to be on the safe side.

You will find the calibration option in system settings.

Here was the testing I did on my unit:

From Charger From Multimeter
Total Voltage 12.2 12.38
Cell #1 3.43 3.417
Cell #2 1.89 2.013
Cell #3 3.51 3.505
Cell #4 3.45 3.431

If you plan to use 6S, you should calibrate it with a 6S battery :)

Compared to ToolkitRC M6

The M6 and Q6 Nano are both small chargers, which one should you get? Let me summarize the difference. And here is my review of the ToolkitRC M6 charger if you want to find out more.

They are similar in price. The M6 is smaller but has lower power (150W). The Q6 Nano looks so much better in terms of build quality though.

The M6 has a USB output for charging your phone or GoPro, which is quite handy, but its user interface is not as nice as the Q6’s.

Another downside of the M6 is the cooling fan location, it’s at the bottom and can get blocked (by grass for example) and overheats when used outdoor.

Field Charging

The Q6 Nano makes an excellent “field charging” solution. This post explains what field charging is. Basically you can bring a big LiPo with you to the field, and charge the smaller LiPo with it.

Also you can “step up” charging batteries with the Q6 Nano, e.g. you can use 4S LiPo as input and charge a 6S LiPo, no problem.

Getting a Power Supply

As mentioned you will need a power supply (PSU) in order to use the iSDT Q6 Nano in the house.

The PSU should have a output voltage between 10V to 30V DC, and should have a maximum power of 200W or higher if you want to use the Q6 Nano to its full potential. However it’s okay to have a less powerful PSU, just make sure you set the max power in the charger’s system settings so it doesn’t go above the limit and fry your PSU.

You power supply will have to have an XT60 output too. Here are couple of PSU that would work:

4 thoughts on “Review: iSDT Q6 Nano LiPo Charger

  1. Oliver

    I have one of these and I’m trying to charge a 4S lipo. After I press start the unit asks “Perform unbalancing task?”. I have the xt60 and the other connector (balancing) attached. New battery and first time using so maybe the battery is bad?

    Reply
  2. KEITH WILLIAMS

    I just got one, I have another one on the way as I’m building a charge case.
    I will say one thing I do not like at all is that unlike the other ISDT chargers, you cannot hold the up/down buttons to scroll constantly. Instead, you have to press over and over. This can make changing the current quite a slow process. I hope ISDT makes a new firmware that will allow you to hold the button to scroll like the Q8.

    Reply
  3. Adhito

    Which one did you recommend to buy? Q6 Nano or M6? I don’t think to much on the power but more on practicality. I’ve seen the pros and cons but that only makes more confusion on which one to buy 😅. Thanks

    Reply
    1. Oscar Post author

      I personally prefer the Q6 nano a little bit :) Not so much with the button, but the build quality just looks better than the M6 :)
      But if you have the budget, get the Q6 Pro/Plus it’s still my primary charger :)

      Reply

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